Socialism as Monopoly

One of the chief complaints of left-wing commentators and modern day revisionist historians is that free market capitalism leads inexorably to the formation of monopolies, or cartels that exert monopolistic control over some good or sector of the economy. As often is the case, there is an underlying current of socialist critique within such half-baked assertions, which omit the role of the state in the rise of various monopolies.

Overlooking for a moment the erroneous criticism of free market capitalism, we should see instead that socialism’s manifest drive is to deliver monopoly control – over society, economy, and government – into the hands of a vanguard of socialist intellectuals. For reasons dealing with human nature, socialists who acquire such power never peaceably or willingly cede it back to the people ever again.

Socialists often pose as anarchists or anti-establishment types, but very few intellectuals above the ranks of self-deluded street agitator actually believe in anarchism. The irony of OccupyWall Street activists donning “V is for Vendetta” masks and displaying various anarchist signs while imploring the government for more free healthcare, education, and retirement benefits simply asks too much of the sane, rational person to take seriously. Rather, what motivates real socialists, the theoreticians and masterminds (Drummond Pike, Maurice Strong, and George Soros, to name a few), is wresting away control of the economy from businesses, and the individuals whose demand fuels them.

When socialists demand that capitalism be abolished, and by extension, individualism and competition done away with, what they really are arguing for is complete domination. There must be uniformity of ideology, a single party hierarchy, subservience of the self to the “cause,” in order for socialism to “work.” In other words the state must have a monopoly, not only of legitimate coercion, but of all legitimate human activities, period.

Under socialism, people must obliterate what it means to be human and to willingly become pawns of the central planners. This is the reality, and not some children’s  fantasy story that everyone would live spontaneously and freely, and chocolate milk would flow down Big Rock Candy Mountain without any duties or obligations to the collectivist state.

One example often cited by socialists as proof of supposed capitalists’ drive to break organized labor is National Socialist Germany. Instead, the Nazis were against free market capitalism and instead sought a monopoly on labor, just as the Communists of the Soviet Union accomplished.

From the Literary Digest, 1935:

“A Socialist Workers’ Government has achieved a workers revolution in Germany without resorting to, tho in some respects it approximates, Communism. Adolf Hitler has done it by wiping out all class privileges and class distinction, but the economics foundation of property rights and private capital has been left almost intact – for the present time.”

And:

“The Third Reich, under Hitler, has wiped out corporate trade-unionism by forcing all workers to join one great government union, the National Socialist Union of Employers and Workers…”

National Socialists were against unions, plural, but were for one all-encompassing German workers union. And what would be the international socialists’ counter-argument? That they are instead for competition in labor? That they are for competition in the economy at all? The foreseeable counter-argument doesn’t wash, defeated by the socialists’ ideological raison d’etre of “unity.” [Continued on Freedom Beacon]

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One thought on “Socialism as Monopoly

  1. I fear that Obamacare is a socialist Trogan horse. If the Supreme Court rules that the mandate to be Constitutional, then there is no way we can stop the onslaught of ever-expanding entitlement bureaucracies. Not too long ago, I heard NPR suggesting that internet access is necessity for education, and therefore should be a right to inter-city children. The story suggested that internet services should be taxed to create a fund like the universal fund on cell phones so as to fund free computers and internet access. Where does it end? Transportation is necessary, so we should be taxed to buy automobiles for the poor? The government can deem as necessary cell phones, ESPN, Ralph Lauren clothes and Gucci handbags and tax us to insure that everyone has equal access? And if you disagree with the government, who will stop the “death panel” from denying you coverage? Only recently, a reporter unveiled the consequences of a worker in China who dared to complain about unpaid overtime and horrible working conditions at a factory that builds Ipods for Apple. Take a good look at China and you can see where our future lies in the utopia of socialism.

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